Ask the Experts

  Dr. Deena Blachard and Dr. Sara Connolly answer all of your questions on how to get your baby to sleep better. You find all you need to know about how much sleep is enough, crib safety and much more. Note: This video was a live video, so the giveaway mentioned has now ended. Please join our mailing list to get alerts of the latest great giveaways.

Our Founder and Leader

Mon, Jul 02, 2018

  Newton Baby’s founder, Michael Rothbard, is a sleep industry veteran who is proud to share the best the company has to offer from their families to yours. Michael Rothbard is a third-generation sleep entrepreneur with over thirty years of experience in the industry. As a founder and entrepreneur, he has devoted his career to the pursuit of all things beneficial to a good night’s sleep for the whole family. Newton Baby was born out of concern as a parent of three young children that existing baby sleep surfaces weren’t breathable enough to ensure adequate airflow. Upon learning about Wovenaire...

  Miss Megan is the founder of Conscious Proactive Parenting and Mantra Sleep Solutions, and is Newton Baby’s in-house expert on babies’ sleep. As a sleep coach with over a decade of experience under her belt, she focuses on proactive and positive discipline to encourage steady, restful sleep. Her mission is to make bedtime more like a dream than a nightmare for the sake of the entire family’s wellbeing. The “Miss Megan Effect” has proven effective for countless babies and children aged 12 weeks through 12 years. Newton Baby is proud to have her on board to share wisdom on...

  Dr. Deena Blanchard is a board-certified pediatrician and partner at Premier Pediatrics in New York City. Dr. Deena regularly contributes to leading parenting blogs including Big City Moms and Momtastic, and has also been featured on AOL, The Huffington Post, The Bump, CBS, CUNY-TV, and more for her skillful health and parenting tips. Dr. Deena’s impressive resume includes a master’s of public health from Temple University, where she specialized in health education. Dr. Deena then attended medical school at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine, where she was awarded both Alpha Omega Alpha and the American Medical Women’s Association...

Save time, money, and energy—all of which are in short supply as a new parent—with our in-house expert Miss Megan's tried and tested best practices for caring for your newborn.

When you've breastfed two kids and you're a pediatrician, you might think there isn't much more to learn about breastfeeding—but you would be wrong. I had my third son a few months ago. I was nervous. It has been four years since I last breastfed and, even then, I struggled a bit in the beginning.

This time, the baby latched right away; after 24 hours, though, my nipples were killing me. I found myself with the same worries I advise mothers about. How do I know my baby is getting enough? Will this pain stop? Am I doing this right?

Sleep disturbances, pregnancy-related insomnia, and weird or vivid dreams are common during pregnancy, especially during the first and third trimesters. In a National Sleep Foundation poll, 78% of women reported experiencing more disturbed sleep during pregnancy than when not pregnant. Hormonal changes, pain and discomfort, and anxiety are three key factors that contribute to sleep challenges.

Progesterone levels rise during pregnancy, which can cause sleepiness during the day and wakefulness at night. Fluctuating estrogen levels also create physiological changes. Nausea, heartburn, lower back pain, needing to pee a lot, and general discomfort can leave the body feeling out of sorts. Feeling anxious about baby coming can make falling asleep and staying asleep trickier.

When you're pregnant and a new mom, sleep can seem like an ever-elusive thing you're always trying to get. As a pediatrician and OB/GYN with five kids between us, we get it. Here are some of our favorite tips for getting as much rest as you can while pregnant and when your little one arrives.

1. A bed should be for sleeping only

I think we're all guilty of crawling into bed at night, and then watching TV or reading a book or even chatting on the phone. These activities are confusing to our body and mind. Try to restrict the activities you do in bed. When you lie your head down on your pillow at night, it should be for sleep only. 

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